Vegetarian cuisine

Game, such as wild boar, deer and wild birds, are now less common due to loss of habitat, the introduction of modern methods of intensive animal farming in the 1960s, and the rise of agribusinesses, such as Thai Charoen Pokphand Foods, in the 1980s.[26] Traditionally, fish, crustaceans, and shellfish play an important role in the diet of Thai people.[27] Anna Leonowens (of The King and I fame) observed in her book The English Governess at the Siamese Court (1870). It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter and spicy. Chopsticks are mainly used in Thailand for eating Chinese-style noodle soups, or at Chinese, Japanese or Korean restaurants. Black sticky rice is a type of sticky rice with a deep purple-red color that may appear black. In the case of Thailand, these words come to mind: intricacy; attention to detail; texture; color; taste; and the use of ingredients with medicinal benefits, as well as good flavor.

They were introduced to Thailand by the Hokkien people starting in the 15th century, and by the Teochew people who started settling in larger numbers from the late 18th century CE onward, mainly in the towns and cities, and now form the majority of the Thai Chinese.[10][11][12] Such dishes include chok Thai: โจ๊ก (rice porridge), salapao (steamed buns), kuaitiao rat na (fried rice-noodles) and khao kha mu (stewed pork with rice). They are tom yam goong (4th), pad thai (5th), som tam (6th), massaman curry (10th), green curry (19th), Thai fried rice (24th) and moo nam tok (36th). Very often, regular restaurants will also feature a selection of freshly made "rice curry" dishes on their menu for single customers.

Non-glutinous rice is also used for making fried rice dishes, and for congee, of which there are three main varieties: khao tom (a thin rice soup, most often with minced pork or fish), khao tom kui (a thick, unflavored rice porridge that is served with side dishes), or chok (a thick rice porridge that is flavored with broth and minced meat). Tables and chairs were introduced as part of a broader Westernization drive during the reign of King Mongkut, Rama IV. Other varieties of rice eaten in Thailand include: sticky rice (khao niao), a unique variety of rice which contains an unusual balance of the starches present in all rice, causing it to cook up to a sticky texture. Simplicity isn't the dictum here, at all. Thai meals typically consist of rice (khao in Thai) with many complementary dishes shared by all. The fork and spoon were introduced by King Chulalongkorn after his return from a tour of Europe in 1897 CE. Eateries and shops that are specialized in pre-made food, are the usual place to go to for having a meal this way. It reflects its culture, environment, ingenuity and values. Goat and mutton are rarely eaten except by Muslim Thais.